Coaching Clinic Essentials

Coaching Clinic Essentials

 

  • Fun! Fun! Fun!
    • #1 mistake is to think of kids as little adults!

 

  • 1,000 Touches
    • Practice exercises and games (especially younger divisions) should provide as many opportunities as possible for players to interact with the ball.
    • Every minute a player stands in line is one less minute they are working on developing their skills (You have approximately 60 minutes!).
    • Small-Sided games (1V1, 2V2, 3V3, etc.) put more players in a position to touch the ball more frequently and develop their skills more rapidly.
    • Player to Ball Ratio Minimums (D1 = 1:1, D2 = 2:1, D3 4:1, D4 4:1)

 

  • “Slanty-Line” Principle
    • Exercises and Small-Sided Games should allow players of every ability to participate for the entirety of the drill.  Variations should be introduced to challenge more skilled players and give less experienced players the opportunity to develop as well
      • Example – King of the Hill (Knockout).  This schoolyard favorite forces weaker players out of the game early and doesn’t provide much of a challenge for more skilled players.
        • Variation 1 – If a player gets knocked out, they retrieve their ball, perform some skill (juggling, toe touches, etc.) and then they’re back in the game
        • Variation 2 – “Multiplier”:  If a player gets knocked out, they now become an attacker and try to steal someone else’s ball.  This keeps all players involved and provides an increased level of difficulty for more skilled players.

 

  • Age Appropriate Exercises
    • Div. 1 & 2 – Technical Focus (Attention Span:  15-20 secs)
    • Div. 3 – Technical Focus with Introduction to Basic Tactics
    • Div. 4 – Tactical Focus

 

  • No Laps, No Lines, No Lectures

 

  • Do not use exercise as punishment/discipline

 

  • A focus on use of small-sided games teaches kids to use skills in the context of real world situations.
    • Example – Don’t weave dribble through cones.  Have players dribble in defined spaces that force them to navigate between other players who are also moving and dribbling.  This teaches kids from an early age to keep their heads up while dribbling and develops their depth perception and judgement.

 

  • Scrimmage!
    • Kids want to play soccer, so let them play!
    • Minimal Coach intervention

 

  • Fun! Fun! Fun!